Jerry - the only conspiracy involved in "finishing" cattle with corn is the conspiracy of consumer preference. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar. a. If you saw a package of "FS" ribeye steaks....what would that mean to you? That's what consumers prefer. In addition, the rib bones are moderately wide and flat and the ribeye muscle is dark red in color and slightly coarse in texture. The minimum degree of marbling required increases with advancing maturity throughout this group from a minimum moderate amount to a maximum moderate amount (see Figure 1 pdf) and the ribeye muscle is firm. c. Carcasses in the third or intermediate maturity group range from those with indications of maturity barely more advanced than described as maximum for the Standard grade, to those with moderately hard, rather white chine bones and with cartilages on the ends of the thoracic vertebrae that show considerable ossification but the outlines of the cartilages are still plainly visible. It wasn't for sale then nor now. @Jim, thanks for reaching out. Is Hotel Cuts a grade or something else? b. Carcasses in the younger group, range from the youngest that are eligible for the beef class, to those at the juncture of the two maturity groups, which have slightly red and slightly soft chine bones and cartilages on the ends of the thoracic vertebrae that have some evidence of ossification. Muscles are usually visible through the fat in many areas of the carcass. Am eating more poultry and pork these days. Official websites use .gov Yes, they get antibiotics, but only if sick and vet prescribed. … Shouldn't this be a requirement by law? Grass fed beef is available, buy it! thick, and cost $9/lb. Cut me off another slice of yet another conspiracy theory! As for grading, they stated that they only do business with reputable cattle growers, and that their beef is extremely high quality. Quality grades are widely used as a "language" within the beef industry, making business transactions easier and providing a vital link to support rural America. There is usually a very thin layer of fat over the outside of the rounds and over the tops of the shoulders and necks. Do USDA grading & labeling regs allow the chain to escape specifying the exact grade they are selling? Their web site sez, "A blend of USDA Quality Grades, with a marbling score of Traces 50 – Slight 99" What grade is this meat equivalent to? 2B. There usually is a slightly thick layer of fat over the loins, ribs, and inside rounds and the fat over the rumps, hips, and clods usually is moderately thick. It is less expensive, I understand that, but I won't buy it anyway. There are eight grades of beef designated by the USDA, only the top five of which are usually sold to consumers. If a product is graded, advertised, and sold as USDA Prime, the packaged product or box must be labeled as such. We grilled them to the "Medium Rare" temp on an instant-read thermometer. Nom nom nom! Choice roasts and steaks from the loin and rib will be very tender, juicy, and flavorful and are suited for dry-heat cooking. According to Hale, Et.Al., at Texas A&M, regarding USDA beef quality grades, "Because the chronological age is virtually never known, physiological maturity is used; and the indicators are bone characteristics, ossification of cartilage, color and texture of ribeye muscle.". In addition, the sacral vertebrae are completely fused, the cartilages on the ends of the lumbar vertebrae are completely ossified, and the cut surface of the lean tends to be fine in texture. Here's a thought, if you don't like it DON'T EAT IT! To say immature can only be determined by sitting down with each steer and talking with them a while to get a better feeling for their maturity level. To Loretta and Jerry---the FDA as well as most Gvt agencies cannot come clean! b. The USDA grade shields are highly regarded as symbols of safe, high-quality American beef. Yes we should vote for politicians that are sensitive and responsive to our concerns. The rib bones are slightly wide and slightly flat and the ribeye muscle is moderately light red in color and is fine in texture. Like many consumers, I am more concerned with HOW my food is produced, than by HOW it tastes and feels in my mouth. Please see answers to your questions. Any comments from the USDA would be appreciated, and help me figure out to get what I expect for my money. While you guys are out there looking for the second gunman on the grassy knoll, trying to find Jimmy Hoffa, UFO's and proof that Bigfoot exists, I'll be out there enjoying my life. Cattle graze on grass in the summer with fodder and corn chop fed in the winter when the grass dies back and the snows come. I raised beef cattle for years and fed them corn. I have to explain "marbling" every once in a while, it might be great to have some exaples. Choice. How do you know what grade of meat you're buying (in Arizona) if it's not marked on the package? So, while it would seem that the USDA beef grading system is effective, to ensure qualities of flavor and texture, I do wish that more would be done to ensure methods used to produce the beef. b. Carcasses in the maturity group permitted range from the youngest that are eligible for the beef class, to those at the juncture of the two maturity groups, which have slightly red and slightly soft chine bones and cartilages on the ends of the thoracic vertebrae that have some evidence of ossification. The circular stamp with a plant I.D number, or Establishment Number, is the USDA Mark of Inspection. What should I take that to mean? c. A 1,100-pound carcass of this yield grade, which is near the borderline of Yield Grades 2 and 3, might have six-tenths inch of fat over the ribeye, 18.1 square inches of ribeye, and 3.0 percent of its weight in kidney, pelvic, and heart fat. The range in maturity in this group extends to include carcasses from the oldest animals produced. I was raised on a Kansas cattle ranch which was homesteaded by my great great grandparents in 1859. However, these standards and codes provide useful information concerning construction, plumbing, and sewage disposal and, in many cases, compliance with them by meat and poultry establishments can ensure compliance with the sanitation performance standard regulations. All of this in the name of money. In addition, the rib bones are moderately wide and flat and the ribeye muscle is moderately dark red and slightly coarse in texture. A 700-pound carcass of this yield grade, which is near the borderline of Yield Grades 2 and 3, might have five-tenths inch of fat over the ribeye, 12.3 square inches of ribeye, and 2.5 percent of its weight in kidney, pelvic, and heart fat. When the standards indicate “poultry”, the skin and fat are not to exceed natural proportions per (9 CFR 381.117(d)). Sure consumers prefer corn-fed beef, and it only took two generations of manipulation to achieve that...people learned to like the only beef available in stores. slaughter house in 1969 the meat was sold as Select, Choice, Prime and Hotel Cuts. In carcasses throughout the range of maturity included in this group, the ribeye muscle is devoid of marbling and may be soft and watery. It's unnatural so the corn makes the cattle weigh more. The meat was so damn tough, they were all but inedible. Also, the cattle tend to be much older than Prime, Choice, or Select. I have seen rolls of USDA Prime stickers available online - I could buy them. I like a little red meat, once a week to be exact. The minimum degree of marbling required increases with advancing maturity throughout this group from minimum practically devoid to maximum practically devoid (see Figure 1 pdf) and the ribeye muscle may be moderately soft. The problem is you need a magnifying glass to find them. Depending on their degree of maturity, beef carcasses possessing the minimum requirements for the Cutter grade vary in their other indications of quality as evidenced in the ribeye muscle. cooked deboned . Again, grading, unlike USDA safety inspections, is a voluntary service; however, if a US or USDA grade is advertised or enclosed within a shield, the product must be of that grade. Select beef is very uniform in quality and normally leaner than the higher grades. Beef cattle are herbivores, fitted by Nature to eat grass. Thus, five maturity groups are recognized. Beef is evaluated by highly-skilled USDA meat graders using a subjective characteristic assessment process and electronic instruments to measure meat characteristics.