Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. Save 50% off a Britannica Premium subscription and gain access to exclusive content. Sir Edward Burnett Tylor defined religion as A. the belief in supernatural beings, such as ghosts, spirits, and gods. Question : Sir Edward Burnett Tylor defined religion as Student Answer: a belief in God and the history of His relationship with the human race. Q. Tylor was knighted in 1912. Sir Edward Burnett Tylor concepts 1. In Sir Edward Burnett Tylor: Tylor’s concept of progressive development …chiefly upon the publication of Primitive Culture.In it he again traced a progressive development from a savage to a civilized state and pictured primitive man as an early philosopher applying his reason to explain events in the human and natural world that were beyond his control, even though his… His evolutionary view of human development was endorsed by most of his colleagues and, of course, by Charles Darwin, who had established biological evolution as the key to the emergence of the human species. Tylor had an illustrious academic career. His most famous book, Primitive Culture (1871), was an evolutionary study that traced the developmental history of cultural attributes among the races of the world. What is the term for a type of religion that worships multiple gods? Like all Tylor’s work, it conveys a vast quantity of information in a lucid and energetic style. Although Tylor was forwarding an explanation of religious beliefs using a type of evolutionary theory, his work was not embroiled in any major conflict with either the Church or religious figures. After Anahuac, Tylor published three major works. In it he again traced a progressive development from a savage to a civilized state and pictured primitive man as an early philosopher applying his reason to explain events in the human and natural world that were beyond his control, even though his scientific ignorance produced erroneous explanations. Despite his clear aim to replace religious explanations of the world with scientific ones, a close examination of Tylor’s book exposes a complex and strenuous relationship between science and religion. In 1884 he was appointed Keeper of the Natural History Museum and Reader in Anthropology at Oxford, where he became a professor in 1896. Professor of Language in Education, King's College, University of London. The most complete presentation of Tylor's concepts is found in his work Primitive Culture (1871), reprinted as Religion in Primitive Culture (Harper 1958). His last book, Anthropology, an Introduction to the Study of Man and Civilization (1881), is an excellent summary of what was, late in the 19th century, known and thought in that field. Archaeological findings were organized in a single universal series (Stone Age, Iron Age, Bronze Age, etc.) Edward Burnett Tylor (1832–1917) was an English anthropologist who is widely considered the founder of anthropology as a scientific discipline. Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window), Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window), Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window), Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window), Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window), The Science and Religion: Exploring the Spectrum website, Is the Danish Minister of Higher Education and Science a creationist? The two became friends, and Christy persuaded Tylor to accompany him on his expedition. He was not trying to reconcile science and religion, but rather he wanted to bring religion under the domain of scientific understanding. Tylor was the son of a Quaker brass-founder. Tylor noted how customs and beliefs from a distant, primitive past seemed to have lived on into the modern world, and he became well-known for his examination of such “survivals,” a concept that he introduced. At his seventy-fifth birthday in 1907, his former student and friend Andrew Lang (1844-1912) argued that he who would vary from Mr. Tylors ideas must do so in fear and trembling (as the present … Tylor’s concept of progressive development, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Edward-Burnett-Tylor, The Gifford Lectures - Biography of Edward Burnett Tylor, The University of Alabama - Department of Religious Studies - Biography of Edward Burnett Tylor, Edward Burnett Tylor - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up), Anthropology, an Introduction to the Study of Man and Civilization. Which of the following is NOT true of Victor Turner’s concept of communitas? Science and Religion: Exploring the Spectrum. Tylor was the son of a prosperous Quaker brass founder. rituals designed to influence supernatural beings and powers Primitive Culture also elaborated upon a theme that became a central concept in his work: the relation of primitive cultures to modern populations. Tylor identified, for example, the earliest form of religious belief as “animism,” a belief in spiritual beings, arrived at, he assumed, by primitive attempts to explain the difference between the living body and the corpse and the separation of soul and body in dreams. Christy was on his way to Mexico to study remnants of the ancient Toltec culture in the Valley of Mexico. Researches into the Early History of Mankind and the Development of Civilization (1865), which immediately established his reputation as a leading anthropologist, elaborated the thesis that cultures past and present, civilized and primitive, must be studied as parts of a single history of human thought. Although mainly a well-conceived travelogue, Anahuac contains elements that characterize Tylor’s later work when he had become a full–fledged anthropologist: a firm grasp on factual data, a sense of cultural differences, and a curious combination of empirical methods with occasional hints of the superiority of a 19th-century Englishman in judging other cultures. ), English anthropologist regarded as the founder of cultural anthropology. the belief in supernatural power. Travelling in arduous and sometimes dangerous circumstances, they searched for the Toltec remains, Tylor under Christy’s experienced direction gaining practical knowledge of archaeological and anthropological fieldwork. Sir Edward Burnett Tylor, (born Oct. 2, 1832, London—died Jan. 2, 1917, Wellington, Somerset, Eng. Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students. All past and present societies could be arranged in an evolutionary sequence. the belief in supernatural beings, such as ghosts, spirits, and gods. Question : Sir Edward Burnett Tylor defined religion as Student Answer: a belief in God and the history of His relationship with the human race. Further Reading on Sir Edward Burnett Tylor. Culture, he said, is. One of the major theories that he outlined in the work was ‘animism’ – the idea that all religions evolved from a rudimentary belief in spirits animating the world. He attended a Quaker school until he was 16, when, barred by his faith from entering a university, he became a clerk in the family business.