Notes: Eremophila glabra has a number of horticultural forms including a delightful white-leaved, prostrate form from north of Kalbarri. Eremophila glabra is popular in native gardens and a number of cultivars have been developed. Fruit develops over a few months and generally is ripe by late summer or early autumn. Eremophilas vary in size and habit from low, prostrate shrubs such as E. serpens to small trees in the case of E. bignoniiflora. [2][3][4][5], The species was first formally described in 1810 by Robert Brown who gave it the name Stenochilus glaber. They are 7.5–61 mm (0.3–2 in) long and 0.8–18 mm (0.03–0.7 in) wide, the end pointed and the base tapering gradually towards the stem. We have green through orange & various shades of red; with the typical Eremophila shape. APNI* Description: Low growing spreading shrub 0.15–0.5 m high sometimes taller. It will grow in most soils, and in most positions from full sun to full shade. Image source: fig. [5][11], At least 229 species are found in Western Australia and about 80% of those are endemic to that state. Stems: No thorns. [12][13][14][15] It is possible to germinate eremophila seeds but the process involves either leaving the fruit in the ground for long periods or removing the seed from the fruit without damaging the seed. Distribution and Importance of Eremophila Species. It is sometimes a low, ground-hugging and sometimes an erect shrub. 1986. Eremophila glabra ssp carnosa ‘Fruit Salad’. Eremophila glabra subsp. The description was published in Prodromus Florae Novae Hollandiae et Insulae Van Diemen. The petals, which give the flowers their colour are 20–30 mm (0.8–1 in) long and joined in a tube with 5 lobes at the end. Bird pollinated species also tend to have longer stamens, which brush pollen onto and off the bird's head as it feeds. Propagation from seed is difficult but cuttings strike readily and preserve the features of the parent plant. They are stiff, roundish and vary between pale (younger) and dark (older) green, giving the bush a two toned appearance. However, many more are rare or threatened by human activities such as land clearing, pastoral activity and mining. Leaf size and shape is also variable but the leaves are usually small and are often shiny or hairy. The most common flower colours are red, purple, lilac and mauve but others are white and even green. A few species, including E. complanata and E. mirabilis have very restricted distributions and only occur on one or two rocky outcrops. Eremophila debilis is found in New Zealand although its appearance there is thought to be recent, most likely as a result of introduction by people. Leaves may be glabrous (without hairs) or greyish and conspicuously hairy. Flower colour cannot be used for identification. Of the approximately 220 species, the following have at least one common name: Eremophilas are distributed across the Australian mainland, primarily in arid regions and the majority of species occur in Western Australia. They are stiff, roundish and vary between pale (younger) and dark (older) green, giving the bush a two toned appearance. Also known as coastal poverty bush. Eremophila glabra is a very complex species with many different forms. [6][7] In 1921, Carl Hansen Ostenfeld changed the name to Eremophila glabra, publishing the change in the journal Biologiske meddelelser, Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab.[8]. The leaves are arranged alternately, sometimes crowded, other times sparse, usually lance-shaped but they may also be linear to egg-shaped. They are mostly drought resistant and many also tolerant of frost, allowing them to be grown in most situations. Eremophila biserrata with its perky orange flowers; Eremophila ‘Belalla Gold’ for its bright yellow flowers over a long period; Eremophila glabra ‘Fruit Salad’ for its bright orange and yellow flowers and Eremophila glabra TAR BUSH (R.Br.) Some species have common names including emu bush, poverty bush or fuchsia bush, reflecting the belief that emus eat the fruit, their arid environment or a superficial resemblance to the flowers of plants in the genus Fuchsia. Flowers throughout the year, and they are highly attractive to nectar feeding birds. Great Eremophila groundcovers. Flower colour cannot be used for identification. Eremophilas vary in size and habit from low, prostrate shrubs such as E. serpens to small trees in the case of E. bignoniiflora. A low growing form of Eremophila glabra, which makes a very easy care and tough ground cover plant. Wildlife: Attracts hummingbirds. The species ranges from completely prostrate forms to shrubs up to 1.5 metres high. The petals are joined, at least at their bases, into a tube with the upper petals different in size and shape from the lower ones. [4], Eremophilas have not often been cultivated in the past, although some species, including Eremophila maculata are well known. A few others have flowers with a combination of these arrangements. [5] The fruits are eaten by emus, which disperse the seeds in their droppings[5] although the belief that this aids in the germination of the seeds is mistaken. murrayana Chinnock APNI* Synonyms: Eremophila glabra subsp. The leaves and stems are covered with small, raised glands. The fruit of Eremophila longifolia are eaten by emus, useful knowledge if you happen to have emus in your garden. Eremophilas are widespread in the arid areas of Australia, especially Western Australia and range in size from low-growing shrubs to small trees. The flowers usually have 5 spreading sepals and 5 petalswhich are joined into a tube, at least at the base. [3] The most recent additions to the list are Eremophila buirchellii and Eremophila calcicola which were formally described in 2016. A significant number of eremophilas have the term emu bush or poverty bush as part of their common names, although sometimes two species have the same common name and sometimes one species has more than one common name. [20][21], Prodromus Florae Novae Hollandiae et Insulae Van Diemen, "Conservation codes for Western Australian Flora and Fauna", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eremophila_glabra&oldid=979815769, Taxa named by Robert Brown (botanist, born 1773), Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 22 September 2020, at 23:35. Leaves also vary in shape (rounded end to slightly pointy) and colour. For example, the Adnyamathanha people used Varti-varka (Eremophila longifolia) in burial ceremonies and in initiation ceremonies. Ostenf. Branches sparsely to densely stellate-pubescent or hairs long and villous, obscurely glandular-papillate, resinous in sparsely hairy forms. (One species, Eremophila debilis is thought to be a recent arrival in New Zealand). nov.(R.Br.) In fact, excessive water can kill many species. 608E in Jessop J.P. & Toelken H.R. Branch, flower and fruit. [2][3][4], The flowers are red, orange, yellow or yellowish green, lack spots and are arranged singly or in pairs in the leaf axils on a stalk which is 3–10 mm (0.1–0.4 in) long. We have green through orange & various shades of red; with the typical Eremophila shape. (Ed.) Flowering occurs between early autumn and summer (March to December in Australia) and is followed by fruit which are oval to almost spherical, about 4–9 mm (0.2–0.4 in) in diameter, glabrous, dry or fleshy and dark brown. The most common flower colours are red, purple, lilac and mauve but others are white and even green. Birds and small mammals eat the fruit. [4], Aboriginal people used eremophilas for cultural and health reasons. Eremophilas are therefore suited to low maintenance gardens, those where water supply is limited or where gardeners want a garden that does not require large volumes of water. Synonyms: Eremophila glabra subsp. murrayana Chinnock APNI* . Blue Horizon™ Eremophila glabra prostrate 'EREM1' PBR Range: Native Shrubs Eremophila glabra grows to 0.1–3 m (0.3–10 ft) in height, sometimes a prostrate shrub and sometimes erect. Habit Flowers Fruit Distribution Photo – Babs and Bert Wellls/DEC Approximate distribution of Eremophila in Australia. Subspecies glabra is the most widespread and it occurs in a wide range of soils and vegetation associations, although only in the drier areas of the continent. A yellow flowered, prostrate form called "Kalbarri Carpet" is available as is the variety "Murchison Magic", a silvery-leaved form with red flowers. [19], Tar bush is one of the most variable species in the genus and the use of a number in one garden can give the impression of many different species. [16], In nature, most eremophila grow where rainfall is infrequent and are adapted to dealing with long dry spells, even droughts lasting years. Leaves also vary in shape (rounded end to slightly pointy) and colour. They are most common in arid areas - in the Meekatharra-Wiluna area there are more than 50 eremophila species and are the most common shrubs encountered.