From 420 BPM on between the legs, and above 480 BPM you don't need a overhead at all. But what’s even easier is to simply throw up one overhead mic to capture the entire kit, rather than two. If one of a pair of … For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Tell us about your setup in the comments section below! Would that do any good? The same holds true if you have your drummer listening to a wedge, placed on his left side. Do a spaced pair 5 inches from the ride and crash? The XY or coincident pair approach wins points for its guaranteed mono compatibility. Now a good baffle/gobo is a horse of a different color. After some well placed treatment I would consider trying some ribbons as they provide very good rejection in the nulls of the figure 8 pattern. Question about some micing practice for ya. The spaced pair configuration offers a great deal of flexibility in placement. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Then there’s a bit that varies depending on exactly what’s happening in the context of the music. I close mic the ride a lot. (i play a 4 piece with hats ride and crash). Properly placing your mics is a critical task yet it doesn't add much more time to your setup. The overheads will cause the sound of your close-mics to change no matter what, so you might as well make sure that the change is for the better. Audio-Technica has 3 basic techniques for setting up your overhead mics for recording drums. This sounds like a lot of effort for just demos but. What would you do for overhead placement in a tall bad sounding room? The overhead microphone, which is closest to the hihat is in this placement moved further away from the hihat, which can be a lifesaver if the hihat is a bit overbearing when played hard - since there is less of it in the overheads, it makes it easier for you to control with a close mic. A great way to start is the recorderman method or the Glyn Johns technique. I would get some heavy blankets and gobos and surround the drums. That works well for rejecting undesirable elements in the room IME. You have absolutely no phase issues because you aren’t trying to capture an instrument with two mics, but with one. Im a fan of little drums and mucho cymbals with overheads (though i like cymbals real low in the mix). How are you setting up your overhead mics? Hello. Hey folks. I've had success with 414's, and regularly use my new pair of M160's. So yes on the drumshield. For me there’s a bit of procedure that doesn’t vary — I do the same thing essentially every time. There is just less bleed … Position them at a higher elevation for a more balanced sound. The second technique is the X-Y configuration. Hey folks. Something like a shure 81? The spaced pair is the other of the most common overhead drum miking techniques, although there are an infinite variety of ways to do it. JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. Here we have a pair of AT4050 microphones set to cardioid positioned above the kit. Question about some micing practice for ya. 13 correct ways to mic up a drum kit. 3 Basic Techniques for Overhead Drum Mic Setup. XY/Coincident Pair . Hey. Work on that and repeat until you have a decent sound to start with, then start adding close mics. Hey folks. The third and final technique we’ll cover today is ORTF. Recording drums is not an exact science because no two sessions are the same. I almost never direct mic hi-hats or ride cymbals. I'll be doing some demoing at home for our new record and I was hoping I could get some opinions. Frequency-agile True Diversity UHF Wireless Systems. Use these templates as a foundation and get creative! I'll be doing some demoing at home for our new record and I was hoping I could get some opinions I'll probably analyze the room and put some treatment and traps that I can. We recommend a pair of AE5100 microphones mounted on a stereo bar. What would you do for overhead placement in a tall bad sounding room? You don.t know if your limited with acoustics above. With these three basic drum mic setup techniques, you can experiment to find the perfect stereo image. I know it sounds … I'll probably rent mics so tell me what you think the best option. It's a big boxy, tall cement room. Not saying I wouldn't - I just find that most of the time the tracks never get used.